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Full text of "A history of Persia"

BY THE SAME AUTHOR.
Svo.    I os. net.
THE  GLORY
OF  THE   SHIA  WORLD
THE TALE OF A PILGRIMAGE
ItY
MAJOR P. M. SYKES, C.M.G., C.I.K.
ASSISTED BY
KHAN BAHADUR AHMAD DIN KHAN
WITH MANY ILLUSTRATIONS IN THK TKXT AND
FOUR COLOURED REPRODUCTIONS FROM PERSIAN PAINTINGS
SPECTATOR.n It conveys the strange and subtle; chann which Persia exercises
over the European mind. . . . What Major Sykes has given us is a faithful and living
picture, without exaggeration or caricature, of modem life in Eastern Persia, and of men
and things. . . . We strongly recommend a study of this record to the Kuropwin reader,
who will iind in it much food for reflection. He will fuel the clour, bright air of Persia,
and live the free caravan Hie, listening to stories gay and pathetic, snatches of poetry and
history, modern and legendary, till finally he stands on the sacred spot where no Kurtipiiau
has over stood, where the great Ilarouu, the correspondent of Charlemagne, lies buried."
ACADfiMY," So thoroughly has the author entered into the Orienttd mind, so
perfectly has he imbued himself with the thoughts, the aspirations, the very inmost lite of
the people from whom his hero is drawn, that to have tnkon Major Sykos, who describes
himself as the translator and editor, literally, is not only pardonable, but is, moreover, as
great a compliment as can possibly be paid to him. Hooks on Persia, Persian polities,
and Persian life have become relatively plentiful, and many of them tfive eontridernble in-
sight into tha life of the people with whom they deal The present book, however, differs
from all these by the abundant light which it throws on the ideals, the thoughts, the customs,
and the life of the Persian people,"
FIRLD*" Major Sykes has placed English readers under a deep debt of gratitude,
It is refreshing to come across u book so far removed from the ordinary, . , . Interesting
and valuable as tin attempt to depict Persian life and thought from within, And us a.
book to read it is wholly delightful, It abounds in anecdotes, mid throws numerous swlt
lights on Persian customs and the Persian cJuirneter* . , , The temptation to go <in quoting
from this entertaining volume is great, but to extract all the good things it contains would
be to repeat the Ixjst part of the book. The UlustmtbiiM are also full of Interest,"
PALL MALL GA/JtTTM.^' Many good stories, true op well invented, will lj found
in these delightful pages, wherein Persian patriotism and conceit are also fully illustrated.
,  , The true origin of wi#, or 'sweet poison,1 can be read in this volume, and much
discourse upon love and beauty. In fact, the book ia full of information, and the ouly
thing it does not contain is a single dull page."
LONDON: MACMILLAN AND CO, Lm